Skip to main content

We've gone 24/7 live!!!!

On March 19, 2014 HaulingGear enabled 24/7 live comfish newsfeeds on our front page at www.HaulingGear.com ! Enjoy! Click image to view  http://www.haulinggear.com

#RadioChatter #05-19-2012 Comfish News Roundup

Cordova, AK
Cordova, AK (Photo credit: WarrenMillerEnt)
Cordova travel lift on track to exceed expectations
Posted 05/18/2012
by - Jennifer Gibbins
The Trask will be spending the season in Cordova, tendering for Copper River Seafoods. The magnificent 1940’s wood vessel was plucked out of the water by Cordova’s travel lift for some pre-season maintenance earlier this week. In spite of a very late start on the season due massive and lingering piles of snow, the Cordova Harbor office reports that the 2012..... http://www.thecordovatimes.com/article/1220cordova-travel-lift-on-track-to-exceed

Murkowski Pushes for NOAA Review of GE Salmon
May 18, 2012
Jay Barrett/KMXT
Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski filed an amendment on the Senate floor Thursday that would bar the Food and Drug Administration from approving genetically-modified salmon for human consumption until NOAA signs off on the plan. Currently, approval of the genetically engineered fish would come administratively, through the FDA. Both Murkowski and Senator Mark Begich have been fighting to stop that approval unless economic, environmental and human consumption safeties are in place.... http://www.kmxt.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=3817&Itemid=2

Google Can Track Ships At Sea -- Including US Navy; Detailed Maps Planned of Sea Bottom
By Sydney J. Freedberg Jr. and Colin Clark
Published: May 17, 2012
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA: Google will soon make public information about virtually every ship at sea, giving the current location and identity even of American warships. Meanwhile, the company is consulting with the Navy and others about security issues. UPDATED: (3:30 p.m.) Clarified Google Uses Satellite Technology, Not Building Satellites Google paid several million dollars for the satellite technology to pinpoint ships' locations. "These things cost three million dollars for the whole program," Michael Jones, "Chief Technology Advocate" at Google Ventures, said at the annual Joint Warfighting Conference held by the US Naval Institute and the electronics industry group AFCEA. Google has talked to representatives of 50 navies worldwide about their new technology and has discovered it tracks ships better than their own commanders can. "I watch them and they can't see themselves," Jone said. "It angers me as a citizen that I can do this and the entire DoD can't."... http://defense.aol.com/2012/05/17/google-satellites-can-track-every-ship-at-sea-including-us-na/

Unalaska: Tidelands to be rezoned to promote economy
May 18th 12:52 pm | Jim Paulin
Rezoning the southern tip of Captains Bay from subsistence tidelands to developable tidelands in order to accommodate the expected oil boom has a lot of political support. But not everybody agrees, fearing harm to the bay's salmon, clams and other sea life.
The Unalaska City Council last week unanimously approved the change to 36.6 acres, agreeing with the city staff's report that it would "help promote a thriving and sustainable local economy."
The change requires another vote for final action, on the agenda of the May 22 council meeting. It was earlier approved by the city planning commission on April 19, by a 3-1 vote with Chris Bobbitt, John Laskowksi and Chris... http://www.thebristolbaytimes.com/article/1220tidelands_to_be_rezoned_to_promote_economy ////// Sewer rates to double with new plant.... http://www.thebristolbaytimes.com/article/1220sewer_rates_to_double_with_new_plant

Opinion: Streets of Cordova - The Good Life
Posted 05/18/2012
by - Gerald Masolini
One of my all-time favorite boats is in the harbor; the Bergen. It's a wooden longliner, about 60 feet long, built in 1939, and has the lines of a swan. At a glance you can see that the designers and builders of this beauty were artistically gifted skilled craftsmen who took a lot of pride in their work. I've admired the Bergen since I was a kid, in harbors from northern California to Adak, Alaska. She draws seven feet and there is no doubt that this coastal nomad is a fine sea boat. After 72 years on the foamy brine, just think of all the stories this boat could tell. Speaking of boats, Bobby Linville just showed me his new aluminum seine skiff, built by Cordova's.... http://www.thecordovatimes.com/article/1220streets-of-cordova---the-good-life

FRIDAY, MAY 18, 2012
We're dumping the MSC — really!... Deckboss just received this open letter from Alaska salmon processors... http://deckboss.blogspot.com/2012/05/were-dumping-msc-really.html

Washington man collapses, dies on fish processor near Togiak
Associated Press
Published: May 18th, 2012 09:50 AM
Last Modified: May 18th, 2012 09:51 AM... http://www.adn.com/2012/05/18/2469865/washington-man-dies-on-fishing.html

Fish Factor
See-sawing Alaska fishing permit values
By LAINE WELCH
May 18, 2012
(SitNews) - The value of Alaska fishing permits has see-sawed over the past year with Cook Inlet prices heading upwards and Bristol Bay on the down side. “Cook Inlet had a really good year last year, and they’re expecting another strong fishery this summer.  Salmon drift permits have taken off with sales made at $80,000 compared to around $50,000 last year,” said Doug Bowen of Alaska Boats and Permits in Homer. Prices have headed the other way in Bristol Bay. The Bay permits, are not so hot. They ran way up last year on expectations of good fish numbers and a good price, but it didn’t really pan out the way folks were hoping it would,” Bowen said, adding that Bristol Bay drift permits that fetched $165,000 right before last season are now selling for $110,000 - $115,000. Elsewhere, Prince William Sound seine permits are selling at $172,000, and drift permits at Copper River are trading at around $180,000 with strong demand. Bowen said there’s been little sales action at the Alaska Peninsula, Chignik and.... http://www.sitnews.us/LaineWelch/051812_fish_factor.html

The Exchange: Recycling and Drone Research
By Alexandra Gutierrez and Stephanie Joyce
Thursday, May 17 2012
........In the second half of the show, UAF researcher Greg Walker discusses use of drones to monitor Steller sea lions in the western Aleutians. Commercial fisheries have been closed in an effort to protect the endangered marine mammal, and millions of dollars have been spent trying to figure out why the stock isn’t experiencing a dramatic rebound. But because of the weather and distances needed to travel in the Aleutians, it’s difficult to study the sea lions and get a definitive answer to the... http://kucb.org/news/article/the-exchange-recycling-and-drone-research/

True Alaska Bottling foreclosure sale rescinded, bound for court
by Robert Woolsey, KCAW
May 18, 2012 4:50 pm
Southeastern Title Agency sold the True Alaska Bottling plant to Silver Bay Seafoods in a public outcry auction in the Sitka courthouse on April 23.... http://www.kcaw.org/2012/05/18/tab-foreclosure-sale-rescinded-bound-for-court/

Arbitration setback for Globalstar
(May  18  2012)
Globalstar has suffered a major setback in its plans to launch its second generation satellite constellation, after commercial arbitration of a dispute with Thales Alenia Space France was decided in favour of the French satellite manufacturer. The arbitrators in the dispute concerning Globalstar's 2009 satellite manufacturing contract with Thales ruled that Thales has no further obligation to manufacture or deliver satellites under Phase 3 of the contract.... http://www.thedigitalship.com/conferences/2006/displaynews.asp?NewsID=2165

Deep-sea microbes live life in the extremely slow lane
Samples from the depths of the Pacific appear to be almost dead, but scientists say they could help in the search for life on other planets.By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Tim
May 19, 2012
Had enough of life in the fast lane and looking to take it down a notch or two? You might seek guidance from a colony of deep-sea microbes harvested from the barren depths of the Pacific Ocean that are progressing so slowly, they almost appear to be dead. Just how plodding are these ancient creatures, who are buried about 100 feet deep in the seabed? Some of them haven't received any new food for 86 million years, when dinosaurs still walked the Earth. And they are using up oxygen at rates 10,000 times slower than their counterparts on the surface of the ocean floor..... http://www.latimes.com/news/science/la-sci-slow-life-20120519,0,3414731.story