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Comfish News Roundup #06-10-2012

English: The headquarters of the United States...
English: The headquarters of the United States Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, D.C. Photographed on August 12, 2006 by user Coolcaesar. EspaƱol: La sede de la Agencia de Proteccion Ambiental de los Estados Unidos - Washington D.C. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
State allows industrial-scale exploration without hearings
POINT COUNTERPOINT: 2 views of Pebble project, EPA study and state's role
KIM WILLIAMS, NANAMTA AULUKESTAI, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Published: June 9th, 2012 09:25 PM
Last Modified: June 10th, 2012 12:39 AM
Last month the Environmental Protection Agency released its Draft Assessment of Potential Mining Impacts on Salmon Ecosystems in Bristol Bay. It scheduled eight public hearings and a 60-day comment period so that the public could participate in the preparation of the document. State Attorney General Michael Geraghty complained that 60 days was "inadequate," asking for an additional four months "for the public, including the state" to "address the technical and legal merits of the assessment." Industry representatives expressed their alarm that the public wasn't being given sufficient time to respond.How ironic. And hypocritical. For the last 24 years, mining companies have been... http://www.adn.com/2012/06/09/2498578/state-allows-industrial-scale.html

Pebble debate boils at EPA hearing
June 10th 2:10 am | Carey Restino
If there was any doubt that the proposed Pebble Mine is a passionately divisive issue for Alaskans, a meeting Monday night in Anchorage confirmed it. Hundreds packed an auditorium, slapped pro and con stickers on their shirts and waited hours to testify at the first Alaska meeting of the Environmental Protection Agency's public comment period on the Draft Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment. Few minced words and even fewer presented a moderate stance, with opponents of the mine urging the EPA to move forward swiftly to...... http://www.thebristolbaytimes.com/article/1223pebble_debate_boils_at_epa_hearing

Alaska to Illinois salmon connection
Fundraiser hatched Sitka Salmon Shares
By JOHN R. PULLIAM
The Register-Mail
Posted Jun 10, 2012 @ 07:13 AM
GALESBURG —
What the founder of Sitka Salmon Shares calls “a small frontier outpost in the middle of nowhere” and Galesburg are now linked by a love of good food, as well as a philosophy that embraces healthy living, social interaction and support of small business. Sitka Salmon Shares is based in Sitka, a southeastern Alaska community of 8,800 people and Galesburg’s Sustainable Business Center. A couple of years ago, Sitka Salmon Shares co-founder and chief salmon steward Nic Mink was working for the Sitka Conservation Society. Mink came to Knox College to teach in the Environmental Studies Department. “My expertise is in food systems and particularly the development of sustainable food systems and....... http://www.galesburg.com/news/x1267870769/Alaska-to-Illinois-salmon-connection

Murkowski, Young Welcome Settlement of Bering Straits Lands Claims
Salmon Lake Land Exchange Legislation Headed to President’s Desk for Signing Jun 09,2012
Salmon Lake Land Exchange Legislation Headed to President’s Desk for Signing
WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senator Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, and Rep. Don Young, R-Alaska, applauded passage by the full Congress of the Salmon Lake Land Selection Resolution Act, finalizing a settlement between the state of Alaska, the federal Bureau of Land Management and the Bering Straits Native Corp., and fulfilling a promise made in the 1971 Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA). “It took more than 40 years, but today I’m happy to see that the Bering Straits land conveyance is headed to the president’s desk for signing. The agreement passed by Congress resolves a long-standing conflict over land selections on..... http://politicalnews.me/?id=14779&keys=SALMON-LAKE-LAND-RESOLUTION

















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