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Juneau: 2012 Buoy Tender Olympics (photos)

2012 Buoy Tender Olympics Coast Guard buoy tender crewmembers haul a chain across the Station Juneau pier during the Buoy Tender Olympics chain pull July 18, 2012 in Juneau, Alaska. Those involved used chain hooks to drag the length of chain across a measured distance in the shortest amount of time possible. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Grant DeVuyst.2012 Buoy Tender Olympics Coast Guard buoy tender crewmembers race across the Station Juneau pier during the annual Buoy Tender Olympics chain pull July 18, 2012 in Juneau, Alaska. Participants had to move the length of chain from one point to another in the shortest time possible. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Grant DeVuyst.2012 Buoy Tender Olympics Petty Officer 3rd Class William Peters, of the Coast Guard Cutter Fir, slings a heaving line at a man-overboard dummy on the Station Juneau pier during the Buoy Tender Olympics July 18, 2012 in Juneau, Alaska. After completing a chain pull across the station pier, a successful toss to the dummy stops the clock for the team’s chain pull time. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Grant DeVuyst.2012 Buoy Tender Olympics Coast Guard buoy tender crewmembers race to dress their teammate in a survival suit during Buoy Tender Olympics survival swim race at the Station Juneau small boat pier July 18, 2012 in Juneau, Alaska. The relay race requires all four team members to don survival suits and complete a circuit of the pier. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Grant DeVuyst.2012 Buoy Tender Olympics A Coast Guard buoy tender crewmember focuses on heating the pin to a shackle during the Buoy Tender Olympics heat-and-beat onboard the Coast Guard Cutter Fir, moored in Juneau, Alaska, July 18, 2012. The heat-and-beat requires cutter crewmembers to work together in heating and then hammering a shackle pin to seal the shackle. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Grant DeVuyst.2012 Buoy Tender Olympics Coast Guard Cutter Anthony Petit crewmembers, based in Ketchikan, compete in a tug-of-war with the crew of the cutter Fir, moored in Juneau, Alaska, during the annual Buoy Tender Olympics July 18, 2012. The overall winner of the competition receives a plaque and bragging rights for a year. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Grant DeVuyst.2012 Buoy Tender Olympics Coast Guard Cutter Maple crewmembers heave on a mooring line during a tug-of-war competition in the Station Juneau parking lot at the Buoy Tender Olympics July 18, 2012 in Juneau, Alaska. Events like the tug-of war promote camaraderie and friendly competition between the crews of the participating buoy tenders. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Caitlin Goettler.2012 Buoy Tender Olympics Coast Guard buoy tender crewmembers take turns hammering the pin to a shackle during the Buoy Tender Olympics heat-and-beat onboard the Coast Guard Cutter Fir July 18, 2012 in Juneau, Alaska. The Olympics blend competition with the day-to-day work crews are required to perform. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Grant DeVuyst.2012 Buoy Tender Olympics Coast Guard buoy tender crewmembers take turns hammering the pin to a shackle during the Buoy Tender Olympics heat-and-beat onboard the Coast Guard Cutter Fir, moored in Juneau, Alaska, July 18, 2012. The Olympics provide a safe environment to showcase the skills of the buoy tender crews. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Caitlin Goettler.2012 Buoy Tender Olympics A Coast Guard buoy tender crewmembers uses a blowtorch to heat a shackle pin during the Buoy Tender Olympics heat-and-beat onboard the Coast Guard Cutter Fir July 18, 2012 in Juneau, Alaska. The heat-and-beat required multiple crewmembers working together to complete the task as quickly as possible. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Caitlin Goettler.

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