Skip to main content

USCG: Dockside safety exams for most commercial fishing vessels become mandatory October 16, 2012

Date: Sept. 10, 2012
Coast Guard District 17
Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Dan Jarrett, of Marine Safety Detachment  Kodiak, goes over the results of the dockside safety exam with the captain of the fishing vessel Castle Cape, Steve Eggemeyer, Jan. 9, 2006, in Kodiak, Alaska.  Though the vessel had a few minor problems they were quickly remedied on the spot. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Paul Roszkowski.
JUNEAU, Alaska — The Coast Guard is requiring all commercial fishing vessels that operate or fish more than three miles from the territorial sea baseline to complete a mandatory Coast Guard dockside safety exam as of Oct. 16, 2012.

This regulatory change comes as a result of Congress' passing of the Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2010. This change affects commercial fishing fleets nationwide, and the Coast Guard is conducting outreach efforts to ensure those affected are aware of the changes with the goal of having them in compliance before the deadline.

"The Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2010 introduces a number of new rules the Coast Guard will be enforcing," said Ken Lawrenson, the Coast Guard District 17 commercial fishing vessel safety coordinator. "The use of 'three miles from the territorial sea baseline' is a bit of a change from the existing regulation, which uses a complicated definition of the "boundary line." It will be a lot easier to understand because most nautical charts show a thin grey line that indicates where that three miles from the territorial sea baseline is located so it becomes very simple to see if you are operating seaward or shoreward of that line. If you are operating, either fishing or transiting your boat, beyond that three mile line, then the 16th of October deadline applies to you, and your fishing vessel needs to have completed a dockside safety exam."

Dockside examinations are free of charge, and currently no penalties will be issued for discrepancies. If discrepancies are found, vessel owners will be issued a worklist and a reasonable time to correct any issues. The goal is to bring commercial fishermen into compliance while minimizing disruptions to fishing.

“There is no good reason to put off or delay the start of an exam," said Lawrenson. "Exams are free and most vessels already have the safety equipment and documentation to pass a dockside safety exam."

A letter from the Coast Guard to the commercial fishing industry explaining the dockside safety exam requirements is available at www.fishsafe.info.  In Alaska, fishermen are asked to contact their nearest Coast Guard Sector or Marine Safety Detachment to schedule an exam:

  • Ketchikan, 907 225-4496
  • Sitka, 907 966-5454
  • Juneau, 907 463-2448
  • Valdez, 907 835-7223
  • Homer, 907 235-3292
  • Kodiak, 907 486-5918
  • Unalaska/Dutch Harbor, 907 581-3466
  • Anchorage, 907 271-6700


Popular posts from this blog

Crabbers get a boost in bairdi Tanner quotas

LAINE WELCH Image via Wikipedia FISHERIES Published: November 7th, 2009 10:10 PM Last Modified: November 7th, 2009 10:12 PM KODIAK -- Kodiak and Alaska Peninsula crabbers got some good news last week -- bigger catch quotas for bairdi Tanner crab, a mid-January fishery important to local economies. Bairdi are the larger cousins of the better-known opilio Tanners, or snow crab. The bairdi boost stems from a big pulse of new crab recruits that biologists have been tracking for years. "That is what's fueling the increase in the harvest this year. We're just getting the very beginning of that year class," said......... http://www.adn.com/money/welch/story/1004091.html

Tender "Lonestar" rolls over in the Mouth of the Igushik River (fishery closed)

The Tender "Lonestar" has Capsized in the Mouth of the Igushik River 2:00 PM SUN JUNE 30, 2013 By MIKE MASON A large vessel, used to transport sockeye salmon from the fishing grounds to a processing facility, has capsized in the mouth of one of the major salmon producing rivers in Bristol Bay. KDLG’s Mike Mason has the details.... http://kdlg.org/post/tender-lonestar-has-capsized-mouth-igushik-river SUNDAY, JUNE 30, 2013 Trouble in Bristol Bay The Alaska Department of Fish and Game shut down the local setnet fishery after a salmon tender, the Lonestar, sank this morning in the mouth of the Igushik River....... http://deckboss.blogspot.com/2013/06/trouble-in-bristol-bay.html Coast Guard responding to partially submerged vessel near Dillingham, Alaska Date: June 30, 2013 District 17 Public Affairs Detachment Kodiak KODIAK, Alaska — The Coast Guard is responding to the sinking of a fishing vessel near the mouth of the Igushik River, Sunday. The Coast Guard is de

Danish commandos 'monitoring hippies' on Arctic offshore rig #artcticloons

Image by Steve Rhodes via Flickr Alaska Dispatch | May 31, 2011 Armed Danish commandos have (possibly) been summoned to monitor Earth-loving "hippies" clinging to the underbelly of an Arctic deepwater oil rig  off the coast of Greenland , sources say. The environmental non-governmental group  Greenpeace  has published  statements and  video  showing its activists aboard two ships that are attempting to "interfere" with oil exploration going on in the Davis Strait, 100 miles west of Greenland. This business has in turn prompted the Kingdom of Denmark to launch two ships and a few helicopters to monitor the Greenpeace interference. The  Leiv Eriksson  is the source of all this Arctic bait and switch. British oil company  Cairn Energy  is attempting to drill four wells at depths of at least 5,000 feet this summer in "iceberg-strewn sea" with the 53,000-ton offshore oil rig, which has made its way to Arctic waters after a month of failed attempts by Green