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#01-11-2014 - ComFish News Roundup


State Considers Closing Kusko Salmon Fishing For Most Of June
By Angela Denning-Barnes, KYUK - Bethel | January 10, 2014 - 9:58 am
alaskapublic.org
Subsistence salmon fishing on the Kuskokwim will likely be very different this coming summer. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game is proposing closing subsistence salmon fishing for most of June to protect the King salmon run. State biologists are presenting their plan in a two-day meeting of the Kuskokwim River Salmon Management Working Group in Bethel. The preliminary plan includes very limited fishing windows on the main stem of the river, all restricted to 6-inch gear. The lowest part of the river would get three, four-hour fishing periods in the month of June. From just below the Johnson River up to Tuluksak, there.... http://www.alaskapublic.org/2014/01/10/state-considers-closing-kusko-salmon-fishing-for-most-of-june/

Frozen fish more dangerous than knives at Dutch Harbor
By MOLLY DISCHNER  Alaska Journal of Commerce
January 11, 2014 - 5:31 am EST
ANCHORAGE, Alaska — A recent state analysis of injuries treated at a Dutch Harbor clinic provides some patterns on who is injured, and on what vessels, in Alaska's fisheries. According to a report from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services Division of Public Health: "It is not surprising that the majority of the non-fatal injuries occurred on catcher processors, as they employ the largest number of workers and process the largest volumes of seafood relative to other vessel types." The division's analysis relied on data from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, collected at the Illiuliuk Family Health Center, in Dutch Harbor, in 2007 and 2008. The study collected information on 366 fishermen seen at that clinic for their.... http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/00f723acaba14606ac8f758262e2fa9a/AK--Fisheries-Injuries

Job growth trickles in Western Alaska
January 9, 2014
Employment is expected to go up in Alaska according to the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development’s 2014 forecast, but not by much. About 1,500 jobs are expected to be added to the state in 2014. That’s a 0.4 percent increase, down from a 0.5 percent increase in 2013. While this will be the fourth straight year that Alaska has added jobs, since the single-year downturn in 2009, it is also the third year that the rate of growth has declined. Why the snail’s pace growth? Blame shrinking government employment. In the past, the government has supplied a slow but steady rate of job growth, according to the report, but several years of cuts has put a damper on that. About 900 government jobs are expected to be lost in 2014, 600 of which are expected to be on the federal level. Jobs with the.... http://www.thetundradrums.com/story/2014/01/09/local/job-growth-trickles-in-western-alaska/1007.html

Domino effect of overfishing leads to irreversible damage to ecosystems
UNITED STATES
Friday, January 10, 2014, 22:20 (GMT + 9)
Florida State University researchers have spearheaded a major review of fisheries data that examines the domino effect that occurs when too many fish are harvested from one habitat. The loss of a major species from an ecosystem can have unintended consequences because of the connections between that species and others in the system. Moreover, these changes often occur rapidly and unexpectedly, and are difficult to... http://fis.com/fis/worldnews/worldnews.asp?l=e&country=0&special=&monthyear=&day=&id=65676












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